Maybe it's our desire to believe that businesses are somehow more efficient than government. Maybe it's our desire to find a way to rationalize capitalism. Just about every entity in our country is being compared to a business, and that's just a bit frightening. Will running MPS or any school district like a business result in students with a better education or will it result in a different way of creating the same results? Maybe if we step back and look at how education can be compared to business in the first place, we'll see why we might want to reconsider that mindset from the beginning.

I've formed two businesses in my time as a web developer. Maybe three, if you count my independent consulting. I've made a few thousand dollars on two of the businesses, and lost a few hundred on the other. You might say that I'm a failure as a businessman, but then again, I didn't run a multi-national financial concern into the ground while collecting millions of dollars as the CEO. Businesses fail. You might say that it's healthy when that happens, and it allows for the free market to dictate the winners and losers, unless, of course, the market isn't so free. The argument against the current state of education actually uses this criteria to say that public education is a monopoly, and monopolies are bad....